Thanks for the Rain

My thankfulness walk today was taken in the rain, and guess one of the things I was thankful for. Yes, my trusty wellies! I love my pink wellies. I’ve had them a long time, used them a lot, and they are still pretty and practical.

Funny, I used to dodge the rain whenever I could, but since I’ve been taking my thankfulness walks round the garden, I really don’t mind it at all. I might mind, of course, if it was pouring in torrents, but gentle rain – that I can take no bother. It’s rather pleasant. Living in Scotland, we really have to get used to it. But after all, that’s why Scotland is such a glorious, lush, green country.

My novels are all set in various parts of Scotland, so rain often features in them. It would be odd if it didn’t. So how do my characters cope with the rain? Like me, they have no choice but to get on with it, but they don’t have to like it. Mirabelle does.

Mirabelle is totally unfazed by the weather. She turns her face up to catch snow on her tongue, to feel gentle rain on her cheeks. Perhaps you’d like to read a wee passage about her preferred outerwear, come rain, hail, snow or sun:

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An Excerpt from Searching for Summer.

Mirabelle adjusted her position, resting her face against the cold glass, listening to the rain so close to her cheek she could almost feel it pock her skin. She stayed like that until the side of her face felt flat and cold. A shiver ran through her and she hugged the duvet closer.
Was Summer cold? Was she dry? What coat was she wearing?
Seized with a need to know if her daughter was adequately clothed for the weather, Mirabelle abandoned her window vigil, letting the duvet fall in a frilly, floral snowdrift and rushed to the closet in the hall. She raked through the coats and scarves and assorted rags and tags hanging there.
She herself hated coats, never wore one: too restrictive, too formal. Instead, no matter the weather, she would wrap a poncho or some soft, colourful material around her shoulders. Two layers if it was cold, three if it was colder. When heavy with rain, she’d hang them around the house to dry: multi-hued banners proclaiming her artless individuality. When the fringes frayed and tattered, she’d discard the shawl and use another.

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So what about you? Do you cope well with the rain, even liking being out in it? Do you have a favourite coat or pair of wellies? Or a favourite umbrella?

Do share in the comments. I’d love to hear from you.

Thank you.

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The Reluctant Detective Series

Searching for Summer ~ Traces of Red ~ Rusty Gold

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Tone of Voice

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A grey day today.

I set out on my thankfulness walk anyway this morning, thankful that at least it wasn’t raining. I don’t go far on my walk, just several times run the garden, counting my blessings as I go, thinking about all that I have to be thankful for.

I’ve been on my own this past few days and decided I’d talk out loud – just to see if I still had a voice since it hadn’t been used in quite a while. But I didn’t like my tone of voice. It didn’t sound thankful for long. I started grumbling about the fact the temperature has dropped and it’s damp and cold again, more like March than May, and it was affecting my joints, making it too painful to walk round the garden more than once, and anyway I don’t feel so steady today, don’t have much energy.

My walk quickly became a grumbling walk instead of a thankfulness one.

I didn’t like my tone of voice.

The list of grumbles continued as I came upstairs to start writing, and that got me thinking about a writer’s tone of voice. It changes too, depending on the subject matter and what part of the story you’re telling.

The voices of your characters need to change too. It’s no use having a miserable character saying pleasant things in a miserable tone of voice. It’s not going to work. Nor will it work if your normally cheerful character doesn’t adapt the way he/she speaks when tragedy strikes or difficulties arise.

In the first three books of The Reluctant Detective Series, Mirabelle, the main character, is an eccentric, bubbly sort of character, but when her daughter goes missing, she loses that bubbliness and becomes depressed and anxious. Her sister, Yvonne, is one of her comforters. She shelves her own problems and supports and encourages Mirabelle to keep going. She’s always there for her. Never too busy to listen. Never too busy to help.

In my current WIP, For What it’s Worth, I am telling Yvonne’s story, so Yvonne’s voice has to change a little. She is no longer the one to be jollying Mirabelle along. She has become the one who needs comfort and encouragement.

Will Mirabelle rise to the challenge of lifting her young sister’s spirits? Can she become the comforter? The encourager? Will she be there for Yvonne?

Fortunately, I’m not one to be down for long. A wee spell here at the computer with a cup of herbal tea beside me and my spirits lifted. My tone of voice will hopefully be better when I have occasion to use it again.

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One of the things that added to my list of grumbles this morning is the fact that I got a letter the other day from my publisher telling me what to do once I have approved my book. Well, that would be fine if the book had come for me to check over and see if I approve or not! But it hasn’t, and it clearly should have. Grumble, grumble, grumble.

It really shouldn’t be long though, so you’ve still got time to catch up on the first two in the series if you haven’t read them.

Here are the details:

Searching for Summer ~~ Traces of Red ~~ Rusty Gold

You’ll find all of my books on Amazon

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*** UPDATE ***

Rusty Gold is now available for purchase as a paperback or as an eBook on

Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Waterstones or FeedARead.com
or can be ordered from most bookstores

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Have a nice day, whatever you’re doing.

I’d love to hear what turns a grumbly day into a cheery one for you.

Do share in the comments.

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