Meeting Mhairi

 In a previous post, I introduced you to Caitlin and Matt, two of the main characters in the contemporary strand of my latest release, A Mountain of Memories, which is available as an ebook here and as a paperback here.

Woven through the contemporary story there is a historic thread, and in the video below, I introduce you to Mhairi, the main character of that strand.

If you want to see more about the characters or the story, I regularly post that sort of information about all my novels in my FaceBook group: Lifting The Lid off Christine’s Kist of Stories

All of my novels are available as ebooks here and as paperbacks here

A Mountain of Memories

A childhood trip from Edinburgh to explore Caitlin’s family’s history results in tragedy on a mountainside above the village of Kinlochleven, a tragedy so traumatic it was wiped from her memory. As an adult she is still affected by the events that took place there.

Over a century earlier, Caitlin’s great-great grandmother, Mhairi, watches the village of Kinlochleven being born, suffering through its birth pangs.

Caitlin and Mhairi’s lives are linked by their common heritage, and as their stories become intertwined, Caitlin is drawn back to the question that has haunted her for eleven years.

What really happened on that mountainside?

What one reader says about the historic strand of the novel:

“I loved getting to know Mhairi when I first read A Mountain of Memories to myself. Her life is undoubtedly harsh, and she carries within her an innocence, a strength, and a romantic heart too. There’s a lyrical quality to your writing, which your narration enhances, and so this reading brings Mhairi even more vividly to life for me.”

Introducing Mhairi:

Hills of the Dead End – Remembering Patrick MacGill

When researching for the historic strand of the contemporary novel I am writing, I came upon this blog post and found it very interesting and beautifully written by Cameron McNeish. It gives a great taste of the subject matter I will be exploring in my novel. Having also read Patrick MacGill’s novel, Children of the Dead End, as part of my research, I find myself deeply respecting the men who built the Blackwater Dam, for their bravery and courage and incredible ability to work in the conditions they endured.

CAMERON McNEISH, Writer & Television Presenter

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The poignant Blackwater Dam graveyard

IT was one of the most poignant destinations of any route I’ve walked. We had tramped from the Kinlochleven side of the dramatically named Devil’s Staircase and then dropped down alongside a water pipeline that ran from the Blackwater Reservoir high above the birch banks of the River Leven. There was a sheen of newly minted green on the trees and the sky was blue. Spring was turning to summer and birdsong, especially that of the ebullient skylark, filled the air. It was hard to imagine the desolation, the strife and the sheer pathos of the industrial scene that dominated this landscape a hundred years before.

In the distance a long, low wall ran across the horizon, the line of the Blackwater Dam, and as we approached it a dumpy, drumlin-like hillock took our attention. Fifty metres from the track and pipeline a wooden fence…

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